Spotlights -

The People of the Thames River PRC

Friday, August 14, 2020

The Thames River PRC is pleased to announce that Dr. Bulent Mutus, Professor Emeritus at the University of Windsor, will be testing a new phosphorus sorption material at the Roesch Farms demonstration site beginning this fall, in time for the heavier rainfall period. 

As a biochemist and enzymologist, he has worked on several projects to find materials that can extract phosphorus from agricultural wastewater. He is partnering with PhD candidate David Ure for this study.

Thursday, March 26, 2020

Mary Clare Latimer, who is the new Thames River Phosphorus Reduction Collaborative (PRC) steering committee co-chair representing Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Cities Initiative (GLSLCI), has always been a champion of the environment. So when the Chatham-Kent (C-K) municipal councillor was asked to step into the role, she was happy to say yes.

 

“Chatham-Kent is situated on a floodplain, surrounded by water, so we’re on the front line of Lake Erie water issues,” she says, pointing out that her area accounts for 20 per cent or 4,800 kilometres of the municipal drains in Ontario.

Thursday, March 26, 2020

Catherine Febria is passionate about connecting land and water, people and nature, and her current research work in freshwater restoration shows it.

 

Febria is an assistant professor and the Canada Research Chair in Freshwater Restoration Ecology at the University of Windsor’s Great Lakes Institute for Environmental Research (GLIER). There she runs the Healthy Headwaters Lab and team (www.HealthyHeadwatersLab.ca).

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This project was funded in part through the Canadian Agricultural Partnership, a federal-provincial-territorial initiative.

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Reduction Collaborative